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Migratory Hurdle

Page history last edited by Bob-RJ Burkhart 10 years, 1 month ago

Return to: Eye of the Whale (1969 USFWS) ... StoryTech Singularity ... TMA-TAMUG Cape Gibson ... whales tale

 

Eye of the whale: epic passage from Baja to Siberia

Dick Russell - 2001 - Nature - 688 pages

He is planning to title a documentary tracing the gray whales' migration  

Migratory Hurdle , for the long obstacle course they must run. ...

books.google.com/books?isbn=0684866080...  

 

Planet Earth: The Future

Main article: Planet Earth: The Future

The latter episodes were supplemented by Planet Earth: The Future, a series of three 60-minute films that highlight the conservation issues surrounding some of the featured species and environments. The programmes are narrated by Simon Poland and the series producer was Fergus Beeley. The series began transmission on BBC Four after the ninth episode, "Shallow Seas".[16]

 


Connection to the atmosphere

The study of the oceans is intimately linked to understanding global climate changes, potential global warming and related biosphere concerns.  The atmosphere and ocean are linked because of evaporation and precipitation as well as thermal flux (and solar insolation). Wind stress is a major driver of ocean currents while the ocean is a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Our planet is invested with two great oceans; one visible, the other invisible; one underfoot,
the other overhead; one entirely envelopes it, the other covers about two thirds of its surface.
Matthew F. Maury (1855) The Physical Geography of the Seas and Its Meteorology

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1559630884/ref=cm_rdp_product

Book overview:

Inches below the surface, [the whales] appear not so much gray as whitish blue. The immensity of these creatures is overwhelming. Fully grown they reach at least thirty-five feet in length and weigh more than thirty tons -- ten times the size of a large elephant. The mother dwarfs our little boat. The calf is nearly one-third her size. With a mere flick of the tail, either whale could overturn us.

 

Eye of the Whale focuses on one great whale in particular -- the coastal-traveling California gray whale. Gray whales make the longest migration of any mammal -- from the lagoons of Baja California to the feeding grounds of the Bering Strait between Alaska and Siberia (nearly 6,000 miles). That the gray whale exists today is nothing short of miraculous. Whaling fleets twice massacred the species to near extinction -- first during the nineteenth century and again during the early part of the twentieth century. As they moved in for the kill, whalers claimed their prey by naming it: "Hard-Head"; "Devil-fish"; "sea-serpent crossed with an alligator."

 

These ominous tags suggest a fearsome creature, yet today the grays are most commonly known as the friendly whale, the species that inspired the whale-watching industry. Eye of the Whale shows the life-changing effect the gray whale has had upon people past and present -- whalers, hunters, marine scientists, whale watchers, and even businessmen -- who have looked into the eye of a whale and have come away transformed. Over the course of this astonishing book, the gray whale emerges as a millennial metaphor, mirroring a host of ecological, political, and social issues concerning our relationship to nature.

 

The book also traces the remarkable story of Charles Melville Scammon, the whaling captain responsible for bringing gray whales to the brink of extinction after discovering the Baja lagoons in the 1850s to 1860s. Paradoxically, he went on to become one of the most renowned naturalist writers of his time, and in 1874 authored and illustrated a still-definitive work, The Marine Mammals of the North-Western Coast of North America.

More than a hundred years later, author Dick Russell sets out to track the migration of the gray whale and to retrace Scammon's own path. This epic journey stretches from Mexico to California, Oregon, Washington, Vancouver Island, Alaska, and into Siberia and even remote Sakhalin Island in the Russian Far East. In these exotic locales seethe the current controversies surrounding the gray whale: an effort by Mitsubishi and the Mexican government to build a massive new salt factory within its pristine nursery area; the Makah tribe's renewed hunting of gray whales after a hiatus of seventy years; Japan's recruitment of the Makah and other indigenous peoples in their quest to resurrect commercial whaling.

 

Eye of the Whale is a stunning work of scientific reporting and travel writing that greatly advances our understanding not only of the gray whale but of the natural world. While it may be impossible to know for certain the fate of this majestic creature, with Russell's sage guidance we may glimpse it -- in the eye of the whale.

 

Inches below the surface, [the whales] appear not so much gray as whitish blue. The immensity of these creatures is overwhelming. Fully grown they reach at least thirty-five feet in length and weigh more than thirty tons -- ten times the size of a large elephant. The mother dwarfs our little boat. The calf is nearly one-third her size. With a mere flick of the tail, either whale could overturn us.

 

Eye of the Whale focuses on one great whale in particular -- the coastal-traveling California gray whale. Gray whales make the longest migration of any mammal -- from the lagoons of Baja California to the feeding grounds of the Bering Strait between Alaska and Siberia (nearly 6,000 miles). That the gray whale exists today is nothing short of miraculous. Whaling fleets twice massacred the species to near extinction -- first during the nineteenth century and again during the early part of the twentieth century. As they moved in for the kill, whalers claimed their prey by naming it: "Hard-Head"; "Devil-fish"; "sea-serpent crossed with an alligator."

 

These ominous tags suggest a fearsome creature, yet today the grays are most commonly known as the friendly whale, the species that inspired the whale-watching industry. Eye of the Whale shows the life-changing effect the gray whale has had upon people past and present -- whalers, hunters, marine scientists, whale watchers, and even businessmen -- who have looked into the eye of a whale and have come away transformed. Over the course of this astonishing book, the gray whale emerges as a millennial metaphor, mirroring a host of ecological, political, and social issues concerning our relationship to nature.

 

The book also traces the remarkable story of Charles Melville Scammon, the whaling captain responsible for bringing gray whales to the brink of extinction after discovering the Baja lagoons in the 1850s to 1860s. Paradoxically, he went on to become one of the most renowned naturalist writers of his time, and in 1874 authored and illustrated a still-definitive work, The Marine Mammals of the North-Western Coast of North America.

More than a hundred years later, author Dick Russell sets out to track the migration of the gray whale and to retrace Scammon's own path. This epic journey stretches from Mexico to California, Oregon, Washington, Vancouver Island, Alaska, and into Siberia and even remote Sakhalin Island in the Russian Far East. In these exotic locales seethe the current controversies surrounding the gray whale: an effort by Mitsubishi and the Mexican government to build a massive new salt factory within its pristine nursery area; the Makah tribe's renewed hunting of gray whales after a hiatus of seventy years; Japan's recruitment of the Makah and other indigenous peoples in their quest to resurrect commercial whaling.

 

Eye of the Whale is a stunning work of scientific reporting and travel writing that greatly advances our understanding not only of the gray whale but of the natural world. While it may be impossible to know for certain the fate of this majestic creature, with Russell's sage guidance we may glimpse it -- in the eye of the whale.


 

Movements of migrating green turtles in relation to AVHRR derived ...

by GC Hays - 2001 - Cited by 18 - Related articles

migratory hurdle to the turtles if they had headed in this direction. ....

Northern Right Whale. Journal of Wildlife Management, 61, 1393–1405. ...

www.informaworld.com/index/MN5RFJL3U3NQA2UE.pdf

 

Testing the navigational abilities of ocean migrants: displacement experiments …

exeter.ac.uk [PDF] 

P Luschi, S Åkesson, AC Broderick, F Glen, BJ … - Behavioral Ecology and …, 2001 - Springer

Abstract Like many animals migrating through the oceans, sea turtles face difficult navigational

tasks when they have to reach distant, specific sites. The paradig- matic case of Brazilian green

turtles (Chelonia mydas), which nest on the tiny Ascension Island in the middle of the ...

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[PDF] Island-finding ability of marine turtles

royalsocietypublishing.org [PDF] 

… S Åkesson, AC Broderick, F Glen … - … of the Royal …, 2003 - rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org

Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) swim from foraging grounds along the Brazilian coast to Ascension

Island to nest, over 2200 km distant in the middle of the equatorial Atlantic. To test the hypothesis

that turtles use wind-borne cues to locate Ascension Island we found turtles that had just ...

Cited by 28 - Related articles - BL Direct - All 24 versions

 

Environmental correlates of nesting in loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta

seaturtle.org [PDF] 

DA Pike - Animal Behaviour, 2008 - Elsevier

Little is known about the specific environmental cues that gravid females use to initiate nesting

behaviours, especially in aquatic species that are restricted to nesting in terrestrial

environments. I used 15 atmospheric and oceanic environmental variables to help ...

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[HTML] Natural beaches confer fitness benefits to nesting marine turtles

royalsocietypublishing.org [HTML] 

DA Pike - Biology Letters, 2008 - rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org

Coastal ecosystems provide vital linkages between aquatic and terrestrial habitats and thus support

extremely high levels of biodiversity. However, coastlines also contain the highest densities of

human development anywhere on the planet and are favoured destinations for tourists, ...

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Sea turtles: navigating with magnetism

sc.edu [PDF] 

KJ Lohmann - Current Biology, 2007 - Elsevier

The ability of sea turtles to navigate across vast expanses of seemingly featureless ocean has

long fascinated biologists. As hatchlings, turtles that have never before been in the ocean establish

unerring courses toward the open sea and then maintain them after swimming beyond ...

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Goal navigation and island-finding in sea turtles

seaturtle.org [PDF] 

KJ Lohmann, P Luschi, GC Hays - Journal of Experimental Marine Biology …, 2008 - Elsevier

Both juvenile and adult turtles use the Earth's magnetic field as a source of navigational

information. Laboratory experiments have provided evidence that juvenile green turtles learn

the magnetic topography of their feeding grounds and acquire a “magnetic map” that ...

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The sensory ecology of ocean navigation

biologists.org [HTML] 

KJ Lohmann, CMF Lohmann, CS … - Journal of Experimental …, 2008 - jeb.biologists.org

How animals guide themselves across vast expanses of open ocean, sometimes to specific geographic

areas, has remained an enduring mystery of behavioral biology. In this review we briefly contrast

underwater oceanic navigation with terrestrial navigation and summarize the advantages ...

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Aeromechanics in aeroecology: flight biology in the aerosphere

oxfordjournals.org [HTML] 

SM Swartz, KS Breuer, DJ Willis - … and Comparative Biology, 2008 - Soc Integ Comp Biol

The physical environment of the aerosphere is both complex and dynamic, and poses many

challenges to the locomotor systems of the three extant evolutionary lineages of flying

animals. Many features of the aerosphere, operating over spatial and temporal scales of ...

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[PDF] Vulnerability of Marine Turtles to Climate Change

seaturtle.org [PDF] 

ES Poloczanska, CJ Limpus, GC Hays - Advances in marine biology, 2009 - seaturtle.org

This chapter was originally published in the book Advances in Marine Biology, Vol. 56, published

by Elsevier, and the attached copy is provided by Elsevier for the author's benefit and for the

benefit of the author's institution, for non-commercial research and educational use ...

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[PDF] Investigating the Potential for a PES (Payment for Environmental Services) …

itc.nl [PDF] 

Z Fan - 2008 - itc.nl

Marine Turtle Breeding Sites in Crete, Greece ... Course Title: Geo-Information Science and

Earth Observation for Environmental Modelling and Management ... Consortium partners: University

of Southampton (UK) Lund University (Sweden) University of Warsaw (Poland) ...

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Male Humpbacks Call Each Other Out : Discovery News

 
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news.discovery.com › Animal News - Cached

 

 

Planet Earth (TV series) - Wikipedia

 
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Comments (2)

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 5:10 am on Apr 26, 2010

While many of Maury's theories advanced in this volume have since been disproved, The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855) remains one of the seminal treatises on oceanography. Nine editions of this work have been published, the latest in 1963.

His choice of Confederate side in the Civil War made him unemployable by any federal agency, so he bounced around a little before landing a position as a professor of physics at the Virginia Military Institute.

His anti-Union choice, however, has not prevented modern federal agencies which owe a debt to his work from paying homage, such as was done by the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ...
http://celebrating200years.noaa.gov/rarebooks/sea/welcome.html

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 5:04 am on Apr 26, 2010

Also see: EagleSpeak: Sunday Ship History: "The Pathfinder of the Sea"
Sep 30, 2007 ... The Pathfinder of the Seas," it calls him.
"The genius who first snatched from ocean and atmosphere the secret of their laws." ...
http://www.eaglespeak.us/2007/09/sunday-ship-history-pathfinder-of-sea.html

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