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Pappan's Ferry Pathfinders

Page history last edited by Bob-RJ Burkhart 10 years, 2 months ago Saved with comment

Return  to: Kaw Nation ... Kaw Valley Heritage Trails ... Mapping the West ... Pathfinders

 

Papin's Ferry and other Kansas (Kaw) River Crossings

Gold Rush Words :: Visual Thesarus Mindmaps 

 

Pathfinder Passports(cc) Ferry Search

2012_OCTA-Convention-Promo_xi-d07msw.pdf

"world human geography" ethnocide "legal fiction"


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The 23 "half-breed tracts" began at the eastern edge of the 1825 reservation

extending 23 miles east on the north bank of the Kansas River, from present-day Topeka nearly to Lawrence.

 

“Real tolerance means more than just colorblindness and impartiality.
It means making an extra effort to get to know
and understand your neighbor.”
Justice William J. Brennan, Jr.

 

OCTA-Trails_BUS-TOUR_T-H_LAWR-TOPEKA_5-11.pdf

 


 

The Treaty of 1825 granted "half-breed tracts" to 23 people

of mixed Kansa Indian/Euro-Amercan (mostly French) ancestry. 

 

They were square-mile tracts on the north bank of the Kansas River, starting at the future Gage Boulevard in Topeka and working east.  Tracts 1 through 4 were granted to the Gonville sisters.  Tract 3 was granted to Julie Gonville, and it became North Topeka.  Three of the Gonville sisters married Papan brothers, who were themselves sons of a French father, Potawatomi mother.  This effectively gave the Papans a monopoly on ferry service at the site of future Topeka.

 

After Kansas Territory was created, O.A. Curtis emigrated to Kansas from Indiana and married Julie Gonville's daughter.  He helped the Papans with their ferry, later operated ferries on his own a several locations.  His father, William Curtis, and Louis Laurent laid out North Topeka.  It was initially named Eugene, after the village where the Curtises had lived in Indiana.  The railroad came through in 1866, Eugene was annexed by the City of Topeka in 1867.  The street names in North Topeka include Curtis, Laurent, Eugene, and others related to early history of the area.

 

O.A. Curtis and Ellen Gonville became the parents of a son on January 25, 1860.  This son, named Charles, became a lawyer, County Attorney of Shawnee County (1885-1889), U.S. Congressman (1893-1907), U.S. Senator (1907-1913 and 1915-1929), and Vice President of the United States (1929-1933).

 

Overland Journal 19-1 | OCTA Trails Store

Overland Journal 19-1. Volume 19, Number 1 (Spring 2001)
"Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail" by Jimmie G. Benbrook; ...
https://www.octa-trails.org/store/product.php?productid=4226 - Cached

 

Pappan-Ferry-Crossing_Historic-Trails_BioGeography-SEPT.pdf

 

Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail - Missouri Valley ...

www.kchistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/...Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail ... 
Abstract, Illustrations, maps, and article about the Pappan's Ferry, a ferry on the ... Author, Jimmie G. Benbrook ...

 

 

Jimmie G. Benbrook - Missouri Valley Special Collections : Search ...

www.kchistory.org/cdm4/results.php?...exact...BenbrookSearch results for: 1 item(s) for: "Jimmie G. Benbrook... 
Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail, Spring//2001,
Illustrations, maps, and article about the ...

 

*** 

Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail

Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail

Spring//2001 Illustrations, maps, and article about the Pappan's Ferry, a ferry on the Kansas River at Topeka, Kansas established by Joseph Pappan (a French fur trader from Saint Louis) in 1842 originally for "the...
Access This Item This document is not available online. You may come to the Missouri Valley Room to view it or request a photocopy from the Library's Document Delivery service. http://www.kclibrary.org/copy-requests
CONTENTdm number

17598

 

OCTA Trails Store

Overland Journal 19-1. $5.00. Volume 19, Number 1 (Spring 2001)"Pappan's ...
https://www.octa-trails.org/store/category.php?categoryid=all... - Cached

Show more results from octa-trails.org

  1. Overland Journal

    Jump to 2001: Volume 19‎: 2001. Overland Journal 19-1.
    Volume 19, Number 1 (Spring 2001). "The Look of the Elephant" by Andy Hammond. "Pappan's Ferry ...
    www.octa-colorado.org/overland_journal.htm - Cached - Similar
  2. Indians and emigrants: encounters on the overland trails - Google Books Result

    Michael L. Tate - 2006 - History - 328 pages
    Benbrook, Jimmie G. "Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail."
    Overland Journal
    19 (Spring 2001): 2-21. Berkhofer, Robert P., Jr. "Native Americans ...
    books.google.com/books?isbn=080613710X...

 


 

California Trail - Missouri Valley Special Collections : Search ...

Pappan's Ferry and the Oregon-California Trail, Spring//2001 ...
OCTA Turns 25, Summer 2007, The whole issue of "Overland Journal" is dedicated to the 25th ...
localhistory.kclibrary.org/.../results.php?... - Cached

 

 

(Papin’s) operation began in 1842 and was located between the present Topeka Boulevard bridge
and the present Kansas Avenue bridge.
It was subject to relocation depending on ebb and flow
of the Kansas River.  (Barry, Louise. The Beginning of the West:

Annals of the Kansas Gateway to the American West, 1540-1854. Topeka, 1972) @
http://bit.ly/yZohHK

    


Image:

Title: Date: Description:

1. Clay County, Missouri Friends: Allen, Arthur, Thornton, Doniphan Clay County, Missouri Friends: Allen, Arthur, Thornton, Doniphan March/May 2003 While the article gives genealogical information about the Shubael Allen, Michael Arthur, John Thornton, and Alexander Doniphan families, it discusses many of the river landings and ferries during the...

2. Ferries in Kansas: Part 1--Missouri River Ferries in Kansas: Part 1--Missouri River February 1933 First in a series of articles about ferries in Kansas, describing the history of those on the Missouri River.

3. Ferries in Kansas: Part 1--Missouri River--Continued Ferries in Kansas: Part 1--Missouri River--Continued May//1933 Continuation of the first in a series of articles about ferries in Kansas, describing the history of those on the Missouri River.

4. Ferries in Kansas: Part II--Kansas River Ferries in Kansas: Part II--Kansas River August//1933 Second in a series of articles about ferries in Kansas, describing the history of those on the Kansas River.

5. Ferries in Kansas: Part II--Kansas River--Concluded Ferries in Kansas: Part II--Kansas River--Concluded February//1934 Conclusion of the second in a series of articles about ferries in Kansas, describing the history of those on the Kansas River.

6. Ferries in Kansas: Part II--Kansas River--Continued Ferries in Kansas: Part II--Kansas River--Continued November//1933 Continuation of the second in a series of articles about ferries in Kansas, describing the history of those on the Kansas River.

7. Ferries in Kansas: Part III--Blue River Ferries in Kansas: Part III--Blue River May//1934 Third in a series of articles about ferries in Kansas, describing the history of those on the Kansas section of the Big Blue River.

8. Ferry Boat Annie Cade Ferry Boat Annie Cade    

9. Ferry Craft of Long Ago: The Pioneer Boats of the Early Missouri River Ferry Craft of Long Ago: The Pioneer Boats of the Early Missouri River December/25/1910  

10. First Kansas River Ferry First Kansas River Ferry March 17, 2026 Tall Charles, a Wyandotte Indian, whose grave is marked by a broken stone in Huron cemetery, Kansas City, Kas., conducted the first ferry over the Kansas river.

11. Four Missouri River Landings and Their Ferries Four Missouri River Landings and Their Ferries Summer//1996 History of early Missouri River ferries in Jackson and Clay County at the four major Missouri River landings supporting border towns in this area including one for Westport and Kansas City.

12. Francis Fristoe Twyman Recalls Battle of Blue Mills Landing Francis Fristoe Twyman Recalls Battle of Blue Mills Landing Winter//1995 Account of the Battle of Blue Mills Landing south of Liberty, Missouri, during the Civil War, involving the author's escape from the fighting by ferry boat across the Missouri River.

13. Grinter Place Grinter Place   Information about the Grinter place, or Grinter house, built in 1857 just north of the Kansas River in Kansas City, Kansas, by Moses Grinter (1809-1878) and his wife Anna Grinter (1820-1905). Illustrations...

14. Harlem Afternoon Harlem Afternoon February/1/1935 Article about the village of Harlem, Missouri, on the north side of the Missouri River across from Kansas City in North Kansas City. Interview of "Captain Kade," former pilot of the Annie Cade ferryboat...

15. Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas 1935 Description of the town of Secondine, Kansas established about 1854 as the village of Delaware, Kansas (in Wyandotte County) near the Delaware Indian reservation and the Grinter Ferry crossing the Kansas...

16. Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas 1935 Short history and anecdote with freight rates of the "Caleece" ferry at the mouth of the Kansas River in 1825-1830, established by Richard Linville and from 1826-1830 operated by "French trapper and voyaguer...

17. Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas 1935 Description of Grinter's ferry across the Kansas River used for Fort Leavenworth, established in 1831 by the family of Moses Grinter, the "first permanent white settler" in Wyandotte County, Kansas, with...

18. Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas 1935 History of the "Wyandot [sic] National Ferry," established
across the Kansas River in 1843 and running until 1855,
as the "first public utility in Kansas," with illustration.

19. Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas 1935 Historical review of the ferries of the Kansas River
from the first in 1825-1826 to the last in 1887.

20. Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas Historic Spots or Mile-Stones in the Progress of Wyandotte County, Kansas 1935

Conflict between ferry service and new Kansas River,
or Kaw River, bridge in 1866.

 

Comments (6)

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 10:30 pm on Mar 21, 2012

*** Ethnocide (i4CQuest-Keyword search result)
Peacekeeping Ethnocide "manifest destiny" anti-terrorism intolerance imagery justice mission
This Wiki is licensed CC-BY-NC-SA - Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike

*** Cimarron Cutoff Route
... Ethnocide Sobering Thoughts May 1, 2009 ... Mark Steyn on the end of Europe (first of five).
How states got their shapes (more than an hour long but mostly interesting) ... www.soberingthoughts.blo…

*** Pathfinder Integrity Assurance influence ethnocide and land abuse decisions?…

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 9:55 pm on Mar 21, 2012

Fort Leavenworth via http://www.forttours.com/pages/sftraileast.asp

Fort Leavenworth, the oldest active Army post west of the Mississippi River, has devoted more than 170 years of service to the nation. During the country's westward expansion, Fort Leavenworth was a forward destination for thousands of soldiers, surveyors, emigrants, American Indians, preachers and settlers who passed through.

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 9:53 pm on Mar 21, 2012

Grinter House and Ferry

The Grinter house and ferry sites are east of the city of Bonner Springs on Kansas Highway 32. The first ferry across the Kansas River was started in this vicinity in 1830 or 1831 by Moses Grinter, and it was used by Fort Leavenworth troops to reach the Santa Fe Trail. The ferry was important to the Fort Gibson-Fort Leavenworth military road, opened in the 1830s. This became a major branch of the Santa Fe Trail until the (1846-47) Mexican War and was also used after that time, although other branches from Fort Leavenworth were opened.

The two-story brick house was built by Moses Grinter on the northern bluff above the Kansas River in the late 1850s. Today this house is fully restored, owned by the state of Kansas, and administered by the Kansas State Historical Society as a museum. In the 1850s the stagecoach line from Independence to Fort Leavenworth and beyond also crossed the river on the Grinter ferry.

The site of the ferry can still be viewed from the Grinter house, although its precise location is not known.

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 9:42 pm on Mar 21, 2012

Marker Topic: Delaware Crossing and the Grinter Ferry
Address: Roadside turnout, east of I-435 Interchange
County: Wyandotte Marker Text: State Historic Site
Via http://www.forttours.com/pages/hmneks.asp

Just east of this marker, at a point where an old Indian trail led to the water's edge, Moses Grinter established the first ferry on the Kansas River. The year was 1831, and Grinter became the earliest permanent white settler in the area. His ferry was used extensively by travelers over the Fort Leavenworth-Fort Scott military road, and by traders, freighters and soldiers traveling between the forts or to Santa Fe. This place was known as Military or Delaware Crossing, and sometimes as Secondine, and here the first non-military post office in Kansas was established on September 10, 1850.

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 9:35 pm on Mar 21, 2012

We’ll also profile three downriver rope ferry operations: Delaware (Grinter), Chouteau & Fish (Eudora) crossings.
KVHAdventuring-mapXchange research notes for Grinter/Chouteau Ferry crossings are shared here: http://bit.ly/wTJ2YT

From 1854 to 1857 other ferries were built along the Kaw River.
Including the Grinter Ferry, there were at least eleven ferries between
the mouth of the river and the western boundaries of Wyandotte County.
These included the Wyandot National Ferry; the Silas Armstrong Ferry; the Willis Wills Ferry, near the river’s mouth;
the (Frontier Military?) Santa Fe Road Ferry; the Eureka Ferry; the Muncie Ferry, near the present town of Muncie;
the Tooley Ferry and Keeler Ferries, approximately two miles west of the Grinter Ferry;
the Chouteau Ferry, near Edwardsville; and the (Monticello) Tiblow Ferry, near Bonner Springs.

Bob-RJ Burkhart said

at 12:45 pm on Mar 12, 2012

The Root article I refer to is Nos. 2-7 on your list. The one pertaining to ferries at Topeka is No. 4.

Leon B. Graves
812A SW Fillmore
Topeka KS 66606
(785) 845-8477
leon.graves63@yahoo.com

“Real tolerance means more than just colorblindness and impartiality. It means making an extra effort to get to know and understand your neighbor.”—Justice William J. Brennan, Jr

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